Niclas Goldberg

Niclas Goldberg
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Niclas Goldberg was born and raised in Stockholm, Sweden. After graduating from film studies at the University of Stockholm he has been working in New York as a programmer for Göteborg Film Festival and as a film journalist interviewing various directors and actors for newspapers and film magazines, such as Dagens Nyheter and Filmrutan. In addition, he has written film reviews, poetry books and directed short films.
Niclas Goldberg was born and raised in Stockholm, Sweden. After graduating from film studies at the University of Stockholm he has been working in New York as a programmer for Göteborg Film Festival and as a film journalist interviewing various directors and actors for newspapers and film magazines, such as Dagens Nyheter and Filmrutan. In addition, he has written film reviews, poetry books and directed short films.

Tribeca Festival / The Freshly Cut Grass Review: Subtle and Skillful on Infidelity in Argentina

It’s in the common things we come across daily that life happens, not among the grand gestures, the dramatic moments, decisive turning points or splendid vacations. Although many yearn for the smell of freshly cut grass on the other side of the fence – if only a small or big change takes place, life would…

Tribeca Festival/ The Dog Thief Review: Shoeshine Boy Finds Father Figure in Bolivian Gem

©Courtesy of Tribeca Festival Time stands still in Bolivia’s La Paz. Every day, thousands of shoeshine boys swarm to the highest altitude capital in the world to find customers. Wearing thick balaclavas and baseball caps pulled down low to hide their faces, the lustrabotas come to work in one of the most undesirable professions facing discrimination…

Isabelle Huppert – Still Face, Broken Soul

©Elle, Isabelle Huppert In a scene in The Lacemaker (La dentellière, 1977), Isabelle Huppert’s character is led with closed eyes by her lover. He takes her closer and closer towards a steep cliff and open sea. There she opens her eyes, and he asks, “do you trust me”? “Of course,” she replies. The scene has…

Banel & Adama : Love Rules and Madness Lurks on The Senegalese Plains

It was fate that brought them together, “Banel & Adama.” Their love is stronger than centuries of traditions, tougher than the stubbornness of the land. It almost seems to border on madness. But it’s not easy to love unconditionally for a young Senegalese couple when the sun, the superstitious and the customs are against them….

The Animal Kingdom Review: The Father, The Son, and The French Hybrid Creatures

©STUDIOCANAL INTERNATIONAL Losing your teenage son to adulthood can be tricky enough for some parents. But to see him turning into an animal would surely be a tough one. Well, that is what the father in Thomas Cailley’s “The Animal Kingdom” must cope with in a world where humans are transformed into hybrid animals. The…

Sundance Review: “GAUCHO GAUCHO” Rides on Otherworldly Argentinian Beauty

In their last film, the acclaimed “The Truffle Hunters”, (2020) the American directors Gregory Kershaw and Michael Dweck travelled to Northern Italy’s Piedmont to capture a dying community. In that deliciously wonderful film, they pay tribute to the elderly men and their dogs who sniff out the rare Alba truffle in the forests, later to…

Sundance Film Festival Winner Review: Superb “Sujo” Soars with Sensibility

@Courtesy of Sundance Institute Is it possible for young people to break cycles of violence? And what would it take for that to happen? These are the questions the Sundance winner of best international feature “Sujo” poses when portraying a boy who grows up under lurking cartel violence in the Mexican countryside. But instead of exploring the…

New York Film Festival Review “Fallen Leaves”: Two Lonely Finns Find Hope in Deadpan Master Aki Kaurismäki’s Unique Universe

Ansa and Holappa, the quiet loners in “Fallen Leaves”, are on their first date watching Jim Jarmusch’s zombie movie “The Dead Don’t Die” in the local Ritz movie theater. Coming out, someone makes an absurdly amusing comparison: “it reminded me of “Diary of a Country Priest”, Robert Bresson’s classic. Ansa gives Holappa her phone number…

New York Film Festival Review “All of Us Strangers”: Andrew Haigh’s Magnificent and Haunting Take on Taichi Yamada’s Book of The Power of Love and Loss

When you lose a parent there’s a lasting feeling of void and regret. About what you didn’t do, say, or hear them say. In “All of Us Strangers” a Londoner gets the second chance nobody gets. He reconnects with his dead parents in the 80s. The tone of what will come is set in the…

Toronto International Film Festival Review: Paul Giamatti Triumphs in Alexander Payne’s Striking “The Holdovers”

Photo by Seacia Pavao/Seacia Pavao – © 2023 FOCUS FEATURES LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Teachers from high school do leave their mark. Apparently a strong one on filmmaker Alexander Payne. online pharmacy aciphex over the counter with best prices today in the USA Back in 1999, in his witty satire “Election”, he explored teacher-student relations letting…