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Monthly Anime at Japan Society: In-Person Showcase of Classic, Underseen, and Contemporary Anime

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Monthly Anime

April 15 – July 22, 2022
In-Person Showcase of Classic, Underseen, and Contemporary Anime

Ghost in the Shell- April 15 with pre-screening party
The Animatrix- May 27 in 35mm
The Night is Short, Walk on Girl- June 17
Princess Mononoke- July 22 in 35mm, 25th anniversary presentation

Princess Mononoke © © 1997 Studio Ghibli – ND.

New York, NY (Mar. 31, 2022) Japan Society is pleased to announce the launch of Monthly Anime on April 15, 2022, which will kick-off with a screening of Mamoru Oshii’s seminal cyberpunk classic, Ghost in the Shell. Offering an eclectic range of classic, underseen, and contemporary visions from Japanese animation, Monthly Anime explores the widely influential legacy of anime. Tracing the lineage of anime from modern-day digital animation back to the days of hand-drawn cel animation, this program aims to uncover the multifaceted and remarkable variety of stylistic, technological, and generic possibilities that have kept the medium at the forefront of popularity not just in Japan, but worldwide.

Following Ghost in the Shell in April, the rarely-screened Matrix anthology film The Animatrix—featuring works by Cowboy Bebop’s Shinichiro Watanabe, Vampire Hunter D’s Yoshiaki Kawajiri, and Akira animator Koji Morimoto—screens in 35mm on May 27, 2022. Masaaki Yuasa’s The Night is Short, Walk on Girl, a JAPAN CUTS 2018 selection and Tomihiko Morimi adaptation, screens on June 17, 2022. Finally, to commemorate 25 years since its 1997 release, Hayao Miyazaki’s mystical epic Princess Mononoke screens in 35mm on July 22, 2022.

Tickets: $15/$12 students and seniors /$5 Japan Society members.

SCREENING SCHEDULE

Ghost in the Shell

Friday, April 15, 2022 at 7:00 PM

Dir. Mamoru Oshii, 1995, 83 min., DCP, color, in Japanese with English Subtitles. With Atsuko Tanaka, Akio Otsuka, Iemasa Kayumi.
Preceded by a 6PM pre-screening party with Japanese foods and snacks provided by Kikkoman. Mamoru Oshii’s groundbreaking cyberpunk classic conjures a startling vision of the future—a new age of global interconnectedness wherein neural pathways and information networks have become inextricably linked. Surveilling the sprawling technopolis of New Port City, Major Motoko Kusanagi, a cyborg officer specializing in cybercrime, hunts down a mysterious entity responsible for a series of ‘ghost-hackings’ that have infiltrated human hosts. Known only as the Puppet Master, the newly-surfaced threat leads Major to uncover a vast conspiracy—prompting her to question her own humanity and purpose of existence.

The Animatrix

Friday, May 27, 2022 at 7:00 PM

Dir. Peter Chung, Andy Jones, Yoshiaki Kawajiri, Takeshi Koike, Mahiro Maeda, Koji Morimoto, Shinichiro Watanabe; 2003, 102 min., 35mm, color, in English. With Keanu Reeves, Carrie-Anne Moss, Clayton Watson.
A straight-to-DVD classic, the anime companion to The Matrix series received a limited number of theatrical screenings in 2003 as part of a promotional push for Reloaded. Rarely screened since, this dazzling and visually inventive tie-in laid the groundwork for franchise anthology spinoffs with its nine imaginative stories—directed by some of anime’s greatest luminaries including Ninja Scroll’s Yoshiaki Kawajiri, Cowboy Bebop’s Shinichiro Watanabe and Æon Flux’s Peter Chung. Expanding upon the series’ universe, this frenetic and imaginative addition to the Matrix franchise is anything but a lazy cash-grab and ranks as one of best Matrix films.

 

The Night Is Short, Walk on Girl

Friday, June 17, 2022 at 7:00 PM

Dir. Masaaki Yuasa, 2017, 93 min., DCP, color, in Japanese with English subtitles. With Gen Hoshino, Kana Hanazawa, Hiroshi Kamiya, Ryuji Akiyama. Spunky college student Otome embarks on a booze-soaked romp through Kyoto in search of a book from her childhood. As the night stretches on for what seems like years, her quest takes on epic, hallucinatory proportions—starring a fanged god of used books, a guerilla theater troupe, a committee of crab-dancing philosophers, and love- inducing carp that fall from the sky. Meanwhile, an upperclassman at her university (voiced by pop star Gen Hoshino) undergoes a series of equally improbable misadventures in his attempts to win her heart. Adapted from the award-winning novel by Tomihiko Morimi, acclaimed animation director Masaaki Yuasa’s The Night is Short, Walk on Girl is a delightful trip down the rabbit hole into questions of fate and interconnectedness, rendered in an astounding visual style.

Princess Mononoke

Friday, July 22, 2022 at 7:00 PM

Dir. Hayao Miyazaki, 1997, 134 min., 35mm, color, in Japanese with English subtitles. With Yoji Matsuda, Yuriko Ishida, Yuko Tanaka.
25th Anniversary. The arrival of a diseased boar spirit, enraged and corrupted by an iron slug, leaves young warrior Ashitaka infected by its demon curse. With his days numbered, Ashitaka journeys westward to seek a cure for his affliction, tracing the boar’s path to the sacred forest of the Deer God, a forbidden realm belonging to an ancient forest spirit. Upon his arrival, Ashitaka stumbles into an elemental conflict between the forest’s protector San, a fearless warrior princess raised by wolves, and a neighboring iron town that has ravaged the earth. Released to universal acclaim, Hayao Miyazaki’s 14th-century tale is one of the director’s grandest achievements, a sweeping epic with breathtaking visuals and profound thematic ambitions that has captivated audiences ever since its release.

About Japan Society

Japan Society is the premier organization connecting Japanese arts, culture, business, and society with audiences in New York and around the world. At Japan Society, we are inspired by the Japanese concept of kizuna (絆)–forging deep connections to bind people together. We are committed to telling the story of Japan while strengthening connections within New York City and building new bridges beyond. In over 100 years of work, we’ve inspired generations by establishing ourselves as pioneers in supporting international exchanges in arts and culture, business and policy, as well as education between Japan and the U.S. We strive to convene important conversations on topics that bind our two countries together, champion the next generation of innovative creators, promote mutual understanding, and serve as a trusted guide for people everywhere who seek to more fully appreciate the rich complexities and abundance of Japan. From our New York headquarters, a landmark building designed by architect Junzo Yoshimura that opened to the public in 1971, we look forward to the years ahead, which will be defined by our digital and ideational impact through the kizuna that we build. Our future can only be enhanced by learning from our peers and engaging with our audiences, both near and afar.

Credits

Monthly Anime is presented by Yen Press. Generous support is provided by Kikkoman Corporation for Japanese food/snacks.

Japan Society programs are made possible by leadership support from Shiseido Americas and The Ford Foundation. Japan Society Film programs are generously supported by ORIX Corporation USA, public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and endowment support from the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Endowment Fund. Additional season support is provided by The Globus Family, Akiko Koide and Shohei Koide, David Toberisky, Geoff and Fumi Matters, Laurel Gonsalves, and David S. Howe. Transportation assistance is provided by Japan Airlines, the exclusive Japanese airline sponsor of Japan Society Film.

Ticketing
In-person screenings: tickets: $15 / $5 members https://www.japansociety.org/arts-and-culture/films/monthly-anime

Nobuhiro Hosokihttps://www.cinemadailyus.com
Nobuhiro Hosoki grew up watching American films since he was a kid; he decided to go to the United States thanks to seeing the artistry of Stanley Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange.” After graduating from film school, he worked as an assistant director on TV Tokyo’s program called "Morning Satellite" at the New York branch office but he didn’t give up on his interest in cinema. He became a film reporter for via Yahoo Japan News. In that role, he writes news articles, picks out headliners for Yahoo News, as well as interviewing Hollywood film directors, actors, and producers working in the domestic circuit in the USA. He also does production interviews for Japanese distributors of American films and for in-theater on-sale programs. He is now the editor-in-chief of Cinemadailyus.com while continuing his work for Japan.

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