HomeNewsWhy Y the Last Man Was Canceled

Why Y the Last Man Was Canceled

FX on Hulu has canceled its post-apocalyptic drama, Y: The Last Man, after only one season. The television adaptation of Brian K. Vaughan’s Vertigo comic books debuted in September. It followed Yorick Brown (Ben Schnetzer,) the last surviving male on a planet where all Y chromosome mammals have died. Diane Lane plays Yorick’s mother, Jennifer, the President of the United States. The cast also includes Ashley Romans, Olivia Thirlby, Amber Tamblyn, Elliot Fletcher and Marin Ireland.

Only seven of the first season’s 10 episodes had aired when the cancellation was confirmed. The finale is set for Nov. 1. Collider reported FX on Hulu, which is owned by Disney, declined to order a second season of the show after it earned mixed reviews from critics.

The cancellation came after Schnetzer replaced Barry Keoghan; Eliza Clark took over as show-runner from Michael Green and Aida Croal; and the FX cable network shuffled the show off to its streaming division. The timing of the cancellation decision came because FX had to make a decision on the future of the series by Oct. 15 when the cast member’s options for a second season were due to expire.

Many viewers weren’t surprised to hear the expensive show had been canceled since it failed to capture the comic books’ dark wit, opting instead for a more earnest tone. Y: The Last Man fans may also have lost interest in the adaptation since it took so long to get made, the media outlet said, adding some viewers didn’t like Schnetzer’s portrayal of Yorick.

The show had been in development since 2015 and was ordered to series in 2019, but didn’t go into production until late October due to the coronavirus pandemic. “I have never in my life been more committed to a story, and there is so much more to tell,” Clark tweeted, explaining she is shopping around for a new home for the show.

Y: The Last Man is about gender, about how oppressive systems inform identity. We had a gender diverse team of brilliant artists, led by women at almost every corner of our production,” Clark added. “It is the most collaborative, creatively fulfilling, and beautiful thing I have ever been a part of. We don’t want it to end.”

Karen Butler
Karen Butlerhttps://www.cinemadailyus.com
Karen Butler is based in the New York metro area and has written about film, TV, music, books and theater for more than 25 years for media outlets such as United Press International, The Irish Echo, The Brooklyn Paper, Book magazine and The New Jersey Herald. She loves speaking with artists about their passion projects, then sharing these conversations with readers in the form of accurate, entertaining feature stories. In addition to interviewing celebrities, she also covers breaking news, film festivals, premieres and themed conventions.

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisment -

Most Popular

Recent Comments